Speak Up For Blue Podcast

Ocean Talk Friday is back for another week of discussing people and marine science and conservation.

Nathan Johnson and I are back for another episode of Ocean Talk Friday where we find 4 articles that we think are interesting and discuss them with each other and you.

Here are the four articles for today:
1) People need to be included in marine management;
2) Hammerhead sharks get protected under CITES;
3) Marine worms are a 7.5 billion dollar industry; and,
4) Spiny lobster are chemically connected to clams.

 

Enjoy the  podcast!

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Today we discussed the following:

  • People must be part of the equation in conservation projects. This will increase local support and the effectiveness of conservation. That’s the main conclusion of a study published online Nov. 29 in the journal Biological Conservation. In it, an international group of scientists recognizes the need to consider humans’ livelihoods, cultural traditions and dependence on natural resources when planning and carrying out conservation projects around the world.

  • Costa Rica and Honduras listing scalloped hammerhead sharks under an appendix to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), considered to be one of the best-enforced international conservation agreements. Regulation under the appendix ensures that trade is sustainable and legal. Appendix II covers species that are not necessarily threatened with extinction but could become so unless trade is closely controlled.
  • For the first time, scientists have calculated the size and value of this overlooked industry. They estimate 121,000 tons of worms—worth nearly £6 billion (or about $7.5 billion in U.S. dollars)—are used for bait each year worldwide, most of these dug out of beaches and tidal flats. For comparison, that’s more than three times the annual revenue generated by the U.S. sushi industry.

 

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Show Notes

Enjoy The Podcast!

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